Journal of Advanced Clinical and Research Insights

1.REVIEW ARTICLE

Temporomandibular joint - An anatomical view

Sushant A. Pai, Shruti R. Poojari, Keerthi Ramachandra, R.K.V. Patel, Mangala Jyothi
[Year:2019] [Month:January-February] [Volume:6 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:1-5] [No. of Hits: 99]
  • [PDF]
  • [Abstract]
  • [DOI : 10.15713/ins.jcri.247]

ABSTRACT

Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most intricate and complicated loading joints found in humans. TMJ is also called the mandibular joint; it is an ellipsoid variety of the left and right synovial joints which form a bicondylar articulation. The components of this joint are a fibrous capsule, a disk, synovial membrane, fluid, and tough adjacent ligaments. The mandible and the cranium are mechanically two different components; therefore, the appropriate term for this joint is the craniomandibular articulation. It is not possible to understand the accurate points of occlusion without a thorough knowledge of the biomechanics, physiology, and anatomy of TMJ. The primary necessity for successful occlusal treatment is steady and comfortable TMJ. This understanding of the TMJ is the foundation to diagnosis and treatment of almost everything a dentist does.

Keywords: Temporomandibular joint, temporomandibular joint anatomy, temporomandibular joint biomechanics

How to cite this article: Pai SA, Poojari SR, Ramachandra K, Patel RKV, Jyothi M. Temporomandibular joint - An anatomical view. J Adv Clin Res Insights 2019;6:1-5.

Received: 11 December 2018

Accepted: 21 January 2019

2.REVIEW ARTICLE

Temporomandibular joint disorders - Part I

Sushant A. Pai, Shruti R. Poojari, Keerthi Ramachandra, Sajeev Bhaskaran, Mangala Jyothi
[Year:2019] [Month:January-February] [Volume:6 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:6-10] [No. of Hits: 93]
  • [PDF]
  • [Abstract]
  • [DOI : 10.15713/ins.jcri.248]

ABSTRACT

The terminology “temporomandibular disorder” (TMD) covers a group of conditions. A lot of attempts have been made to categorize TMD, but all have shortfalls. Some classify by frequency of presentation, some by etiology, and some by anatomy. However, there is substantial overlap in classification system as they are not clinically suitable. Therefore, not even one system persuades all the criteria. TMD is a wide-ranging collection of clinical problems that involve the muscle of mastication, the temporomandibular joint, surrounding bone and soft tissue components, or at times combinations of all of them. Any factor that affects one part of the system is likely to have impact on the other parts also, so it is essential to avoid blind side when we have to consider likely signs and symptoms of a TMD. About 20-30% of the adult populations are affected to some degree; it is predominately a condition of young and middle-aged adults, rather than of children or the elderly, and is approximately twice as common in women as in men. TMD is the second most common non-dental origin orofacial pain, but at the same time, the recurrence of other symptoms such as earache, headache, neuralgia, and tooth pain, which can be related to the TMD or be present as secondary findings to be assessed in the differential diagnosis process.

Keywords: Epidemiology, temporomandibular disorders, treatment

How to cite this article: Pai SA, Poojari SR, Ramachandra K, Bhaskaran S, Jyothi M. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - Part I. J Adv Clin Res Insights 2019;6:6-10.

Received: 14 December 2018 ;

Accepted: 22 January 2019

3.REVIEW ARTICLE

Temporomandibular joint disorders - Part II

Sushant A. Pai, Shruti R. Poojari, Keerthi Ramachandra, Sajeev Bhaskaran, Mangala Jyothi
[Year:2019] [Month:January-February] [Volume:6 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:11-13] [No. of Hits: 83]
  • [PDF]
  • [Abstract]
  • [DOI : 10.15713/ins.jcri.249]

ABSTRACT

This article is the continuation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders - Part I. This article focuses on the intracapsular disorders of the TMJ and the most common types that we as a dentist encounter. The condition of the intracapsular structure of TMJ affects the position of the TMJs; it also affects the occlusal relation.

Keywords: Epidemiology, intracapsular disorders of temporomandibular joint, temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular disorders, treatment

How to cite this article: Pai SA, Poojari SR, Ramachandra K, Bhaskaran S, Jyothi M. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - Part II. J Adv Clin Res Insights 2019;6:11-13.

Received: 24 December 2018 ;

Accepted: 26 January 2019

4.REVIEW ARTICLE

Current concepts of trauma from occlusion - A review

S. Sangeetha, Kiran Mitra, Umesh Yadalam, Sarita Joshi Narayan
[Year:2019] [Month:January-February] [Volume:6 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:14-19] [No. of Hits: 101]
  • [PDF]
  • [Abstract]
  • [DOI : 10.15713/ins.jcri.250]

ABSTRACT

It has been a topic of debate among dental care professionals, if trauma from occlusion is linked with periodontal disease or not. There are several schools of thought related to if trauma from occlusion is an etiological factor or cofactor for the occurrence of periodontal diseases. The present review article discusses historical background, etiological factors, classification, relevant terminologies, tissue response, signs and symptoms, advanced diagnostic methods, and treatment.

Keywords: Occlusal forces, periodontium, traumatic occlusion

How to cite this article: Sangeetha S, Mitra K, Yadalam U, Narayan SJ. Current concepts of trauma from occlusion - A review. J Adv Clin Res Insights 2019;6:14-19.

Received: 02 January 2019 ;

Accepted: 12 February 2019

5.REVIEW ARTICLE

Interocclusal recording materials: A review

Sushant A Pai, Krishna Gopan, Keerthi Ramachandra, Smitha B. Gujjar, K. Karthik
[Year:2019] [Month:January-February] [Volume:6 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:20-23] [No. of Hits: 93]
  • [PDF]
  • [Abstract]
  • [DOI : 10.15713/ins.jcri.251]

ABSTRACT

To achieve a successful prosthesis, it is important to achieve harmony between the maxillomandibular relationships. This does not pertain only to the opening or closing but is a complex relationship which exists in three dimensions. Hence, it is very important to record this relationship with the least possible error to obtain a successful prosthesis. To record this maxillomandibular relationship, numerous materials are in use and what matters are the precision of the recording materials and their stability. This article seeks to present a review of major bite registration materials and their modification as well as their advantages and disadvantages.

Keywords: Accuracy, bite registration materials, dimensional stability, interocclusal recording materials

How to cite this article: Pai SA, Gopan K, Ramachandra K, Gujjar SB, Karthik K. Interocclusal recording materials: A review. J Adv Clin Res Insights 2019;6:20-23.

Received: 10 January 2019 ;

Accepted: 14 February 2019

6.REVIEW ARTICLE

Polyetheretherketone in prosthodontics – A review

Sushant A. Pai, Shubhangi Kumari, B. Umamaheswari, Mangala Jyothi, C. B. Shanthana Lakshmi
[Year:2019] [Month:January-February] [Volume:6 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:24-26] [No. of Hits: 82]
  • [PDF]
  • [Abstract]
  • [DOI : 10.15713/ins.jcri.252]

ABSTRACT

Materials used in different fields of prosthodontics have evolved over the years. In recent years, patient more preferably demands a metal-free, lightweight, tooth-colored prosthesis. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) can be used in various ways in prosthodontics. The aim of this article is to encapsulate the precedence of PEEK, compared to other restorative materials that have been used currently, based on various studies conducted on this material.

Keywords: Fixed partial dentures, implant, polyetheretherketone, polymer, prosthodontics, removable prostheses

How to cite this article: Pai SA, Kumari S, Umamaheswari B, Jyothi M, Lakshmi CBS. Polyetheretherketone in prosthodontics - A review. J Adv Clin Res Insights 2019;6: 24-26.

Received: 20 January 2019;

Accepted: 22 February 2019

7.CASE REPORT

Catch-up growth after skeletal maturity - A case report

N. V. Hridaya, Amrita Ashok
[Year:2019] [Month:January-February] [Volume:6 ] [Number:1] [Pages No:27-31] [No. of Hits: 83]
  • [PDF]
  • [Abstract]
  • [DOI : 10.15713/ins.jcri.253]

ABSTRACT

Class II malocclusions in adolescent patients are often managed using functional appliances or orthodontic camouflaging. The aim of this article is to describe the skeletal changes in mandible when factors causing mandibular growth restriction were removed orthodontically in a patient past the active mandibular growth spurt.

Keywords: Catch-Up growth, class II Malocclusion, cleft palate, condyle-fossa remodeling, dental camouflage

How to cite this article: Hridaya NV, Ashok A. Catch-up growth after skeletal maturity - A case report. J Adv Clin Res Insights 2019;6:27-31.

Received: 15 January 2019;

Accepted: 24 February 2019